Trafficking in Persons (TIP)

 

Landscape Description

The High Commission to Combat Crimes of Abduction and Human Trafficking was established in January 2011 based on Article 4 of the Law on Combating Human Trafficking and Abduction. The High Commission is chaired by the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) and consists of representatives from 14 governmental and non-governmental organizations with the following composition: representatives from the Attorney General’s Office (AGO), Ministry of Interior (MOI), Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA), Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyred and Disabled (MOLSAMD), Ministry of Education (MOE), Ministry of Information and Culture (MOIC), Ministry of Hajj and Islamic Affairs (MOHIA), Ministry of Public Health (MOPH), Ministry of Women’s Affairs (MOWA), Ministry of Refugees and Repatriation (MORR), National Directorate of Security (NDS), and Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC). The two remaining representatives come from social organizations selected by the MOJ. The High Commission coordinates and facilitates collective efforts of these justice organs in combating human trafficking.

Program Summary/Description

JSSP works in close consultation with the MOJ’s legislative department’s (Taqnin) Criminal Law Sub-Department, which currently serves as the Secretariat and Chair of the High Commission to Combat Crimes of Abduction and Human Trafficking. JSSP conducts regular mentoring focused on: building capacity in legal knowledge and skills to identify, investigate, and prosecute TIP; devising strategies to increase the implementation of the National Action Plan (NAP) for TIP; and strengthening communication and coordination with members of the high commission. JSSP also provides assistance with the preparation of work plans and report templates, and helps commission members develop more effective mechanisms to track their activities.

Project Components

Technical assistance is provided to the leader and professional members of the Sub-Department. JSSP also provides assistance with report writing (preparation of technical committee and high commission reports, quarterly progress reports, member ministry reports), and with the preparation for the monthly technical committee meetings (agenda, invitations, documents and reports) and the quarterly high commission meetings.

JSSP also provides TIP trainings to High Commission members, ministry personnel, and the Prosecutors for Crimes Against Internal and External Security Crimes (PIES) working to build their knowledge of TIP related issues (law, investigation, prosecution, victim assistance and support, victim protection). JSSP’s main achievements have been assisting with the revision and finalization of the 2013 National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking in Afghanistan and the development of the High Commission Terms of Reference (TOR).

Moreover, JSSP has worked with member ministries to develop their year 1392 (2013) work plans and are now supporting them with implementation. Additionally, JSSP has developed, in consultation with the Chair of the High Commission, a comprehensive reporting template to document progress with the implementation of the NAP for TIP.

Impact/Accomplishments

    • Increased the capacity of member ministries and the PIES Prosecutors to identify elements of human trafficking crimes, and to differentiate between human smuggling, human abduction, and human trafficking.

    • Revision and finalization of the 2013 National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking in Afghanistan and the development of the High Commission Terms of Reference (TOR).

    • Worked with member ministries to develop their year 1392 (2013) work plans and are now supporting them with implementation.

    • Conducted several trainings and mentoring for member ministries and PIES prosecutors both in Kabul and the provinces.

A Primer for Practitioners

Tool to practical introduction to rule of law development in Afghanistan, cross-referencing training and educational support material.

Latest Report

Women's Access to Justice in Afghanistan: Since the fall of the Taliban in 2002, gains in women’s rights and access to justice in Afghanistan have been remarkable, yet women’s rights remain extremely limited.